How to Make Any Story Sound Interesting: The Amelia Project (Stories for the Ear #17)

I was recently in the mood for a specific type of podcast/audio drama. I didn’t quite know what I was looking for, but I knew I’d know when I’d found it. After listening to pilot after pilot and being bored by all of them, I came across this show. And the odd thing was, it wasn’t at all what I was looking for. But after hearing it, I had to have more. What is it that made this show so good? Let’s find out with a look at “The Amelia Project”.

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Making Reality Feel Like Fiction: Serial (Stories for the Ear #16)

For the first time ever on this blog, I am writing about a completely non-fiction show. Well, I mean, I guess there was the Candy Crush game show rant, but this is a show I actually liked. The very first time I heard this show, going in blind, I thought it was fiction. Let me explain why this show is brilliant as we take a look at “Serial”.

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How to Make an Audio Drama Musical: 36 Questions (Stories for the Ear #15)

As long-time readers of this blog will know, I highly enjoy finding bits of entertainment that are deemed out of the ordinary, unlikely to succeed, or even to some degree “impossible”. Over the years, I’ve found two TV musicals, a silent audio drama, a silent piece of music, and even a choose your own adventure audio show. And while I continue to search for odd combinations such as these, I can finally cross one of them off my list: a Broadway-style, well-made musical audio drama. But typically, a musical uses music as an audio complement to the visual story, so how does an audio complement work when it’s all audio to begin with? Let’s go down the list as we look at “36 Questions”. 

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Making a Show That’s Actually for Everyone: The Radio Adventures of Dr. Floyd (Stories for the Ear #14)

When I was younger, and had first discovered old-time radio, I listened constantly, as if it were a new Netflix show that I just had to binge. But as I’ve gotten older, although I love listening to audio shows and keep up with several ongoing series’ as well as continually listen to the classics, I haven’t been nearly as vigilant about it as I used to, and I’m far more likely to opt for a movie or TV show than I am to just sit there and listen. It’s great for when I’m driving or multitasking, but to just sit there and listen isn’t as appealing to me anymore. So imagine my surprise when I stumbled across this show in a slightly dusty corner of the world of audio drama and found that I couldn’t stop listening. Over the past couple of weeks, I’ve listened to this show while driving to the grocery store, eating lunch, or just sitting in my room and doing nothing else. So let’s take a good long look at this show, “The Radio Adventures of Dr. Floyd”.

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A “Choose Your Own Adventure” Audio Drama?: Codename Cygnus (Stories for the Ear #12)

I used to love reading those “Choose Your Own Adventure” books; didn’t you? It was fun skipping pages and then going back to get a different ending. Usually I’d try to be smart and think the way I would if it was really happening to me… I almost always chose the path that ended in me dying. But it was still fun, interacting with the different companions and villains. Well, on my quest for obscure audio drama that needs showcasing, I found one that brings all the fun of those CYOA books to life. Ever wanted to star in an audio drama? Now you can, with Codename Cygnus

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Wrapping up a Story “Too Early”: Bold Venture (Stories for the Ear #11)

What if someone told you that Leonardo DiCaprio was making a TV series? How would you feel about that? Excited? Confused as to why he was doing that? Well, that’s not happening, so don’t worry about it. But the equivalent did happen sixty years ago when Humphrey Bogart (star of CasablancaThe Maltese Falcon, and The African Queen, among many other influential films) and his wife Lauren Bacall (a top actress herself) decided to star in this series, which employed a unique technique that worked every time. So let’s take a look at what that technique was in this old-time radio show, “Bold Venture”. 

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Broadening the Audience of a Specific Subject: Night at the Ballet (Stories for the Ear #10)

I admit, that photo up there isn’t the most enticing ever considering what I want to talk about. But that’s what I’ve got to work with; it’s the only photo with the title of the show that they ever put out. Anyway, what am I even talking about? Oh yeah, Hamilton. Remember that Broadway play Hamilton? It was, like, the most popular stage play of 2016 or something. It was nominated for sixteen Tony awards, and won eleven… remember that little play? Well, the reason it had such a large fan base is because it made rap music, musicals, and history all more appealing to a much larger audience than those three genres usually garner. And this audio show has done the same thing. It has taken a specific genre and made it more enticing to those who would have taken no interest in the subject before. Let’s take a look into “Night at the Ballet”.

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Audio Drama… Without Words: The Revenge (Stories for the Ear #9)

This one’s actually got no cover art, so I had to improvise. There’s a scene from the show that one might imagine to look like this. Anyway, that’s not even the point of this post. A few years ago, a friend of mine commented on my wierd obsession with both silent films and radio shows, and as a joke, he said, “Well, can you find a silent radio show?” The more I thought about it, the more I realized that it might actually be possible to make a radio show without words and only sound effects. So I looked for two and a half years, searching for such a show. Hadn’t somebody tried it? Lo and behold, dear reader, after all that time of looking, I finally found it. And it’s this very show, “The Revenge”. 

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The First Reality Show Ever: Night Watch (Stories for the Ear #8)

Don’t freak out, dear reader. I have not stooped to the low of entertaining myself with reality shows. No “Real Housewives”, “Meet the Osbournes”, or “Keeping Up with the Kardashians” here. This old-time radio program pushed the boundaries of what was considered okay to air on national radio, and it is widely considered to be the first reality show ever used for the purposes of entertainment. Let’s have a look at “Night Watch”.

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